Selfish Self-Indulgent Bimbos on Planes

mblphnIt’s happened a couple of times on recent flights that I’ve taken, 20-something women refusing to turn their phones of on take-off.

I don’t mean that they forget, anyone can do that. On two of my recent flights who surreptitiously update their Facebook whilst sitting on a plane just before take-off. This after the co-pilot has made the polite request for people to turn off their phones or any electronic equipment.

Airlines don’t ask you to undertake this minor inconvenience because they are spoilsports, or because they like being difficult. They make the request because flying is both risky and complicated, and there is a possibility, albeit remote, that the signal from an unknown phone or device could play havoc with a plane’s delicate equipment which could result in a crash.

In reality the chances of such a thing occurring are very slim, but airlines don’t like to gamble with passengers safety so they make the, quite reasonable, request that passengers turn phones and equipment off before take-off until the plane reaches a safe altitude. The chances may be slim, but they are not impossible, hence the airlines do not ban the use of such equipment totally, opting instead for passengers to have a short interlude from their devices until that time when airlines consider it to be a reasonable safe point in the flight.

The two women that I witnessed were not unaware of the request that they turn off their phones, because both hid their devices under clothing whenever a flight crew member walked past. They were being underhand, deceitful and downright dangerous by failing to comply with the airline’s simple and legitimate request.

On the flight I took today, we were surrounded by families with young children, yet the woman who continued to surreptitiously use her phone couldn’t have cared less about whose lives she endangered. Instead she seemed to be far more interested on updating her Facebook friends on every piece of minutiae in her dull, useless, self-absorbed life.

The actions of the two women that I witnessed seemed to represent the modern trend towards social ineptness for which the company of the people they are with seem to be of secondary importance to their need to get out their phones and completely ignore live company in favour of virtual acquaintances. The fact that they seemed to believe that their pointless interests seemed to be more important than the safety of others meant that these women were totally self-indulgent in thinking that a reasonable rule did not apply to them.

Now, here’s the quandary. Should I have reported them to cabin crew as soon as I discovered that they hadn’t switched off their phones? Such an action would probably embarrass the women, but is that worth the risk given that every other passengers was being put in potential danger because of their selfish actions? Was I no better than an accomplice because I did not dob them in to the crew?

Of course, no fatal accident did happen, and I have enough knowledge about avionics to realise that the probability of an accident was actually quite minute. My true concern was not that these women were behaving dangerously, but were merely being selfish in thinking that simple, reasonable airlines rules could apply to everyone else, but absolutely not them.

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