Good Life Near A Beach

Humans are comprised of about 70% water. Oceans cover about 70% there must surely be a connection.

We need water to sustain life, so we need to have reasonable access to water in order to survive.

I live in Australia, which is an island continent that is surrounded by may thousands of kilometres of coastline, and I believe that most Australians also have an emotional attachment to the sea. The bulk of Australians live within relatively easy access to the coast. Despite the immense interior of our country, the coast attracts us like a giant magnet.

And so it is, that as I write this, I have a great view of the sea. The Pacific Ocean no less. The mightiest body of water on our planet. The currents and temperature of which determine the world’s weather. As I watch the surf breaking on the shore at Surfers Paradise in Queensland I can see that the ocean, at least in this sunlit part of the world, is benign today.

Watching those waves slowly build, then curl over to break, gives me a comfortable feeling, and creates both a sense of calm and a sense of belonging. As I watch on this magnificent morning, I see a few surfers out there on their boards getting true pleasure as they test their skills against the power of the sea.

Last night I was serenaded by the sound of the sea. The quietness of the night was broken by the constant rhythm of those small waves rushing up the sands of the beach, lapping the coastline, assuring me that all was normal with the world.

Slower than a heartbeat, but just as regular, and with the tides ebbing and flowing like a giant pair of lungs breathing life into the world, the sound of the sea creates complacency and joy.

Life near a beach is a good life; one where most people need to be.

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