Frog Discovering Tour

There are some people who go on vacation for total relaxation, others who like the cultural experience, and still others who are adrenaline junkies so want a vacation that is choc filled with activities which promise various levels of danger.  There are others who just want to do something worthwhile during their holiday.

One of the less extreme ways to achieve something worthwhile is to participate in science’s quest to unravel the mystery of disappearing frogs.  In this case, Professor Michael Mahony at the University of Newcastle in New South Wales, Australia (not Newcastle in the United Kingdom) conducted an interesting tour for volunteers which had as its core a program to collect data about frogs.

The study took place in the Watagans National Park, a rainforest in the Hunter Valley of N.S.W.  The last time a study was conducted here, volunteers discovered four new species of frog.  Many people go shopping whilst on vacation and collect a lot of stuff they’ll never ever use.  Personally, I think it would be pretty cool to have your name associated with an entirely new species of animal.

Accommodation on these volunteering tours is rarely luxurious, in fact, its camping – but the Australian bush is very interesting, and there is something nice about sitting around a campfire having a drink and a chat.

Part of the reason why participants live in camps is because much of the work needs to be undertaken at night, frogs being nocturnal, so it makes much sense to live near where the work will take place.

The activity level is described as being moderate, which means that most able-bodied people would be able to cope.  If you are interested in finding a frog or participating in a similar venture anywhere in the world next time you go away, follow this Earthwatch link for more information.

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