Ads for the ancients as Colosseum looks for sponsors

Roman authorities have advertised internationally looking for sponsors to help fund restoration of the Colosseum, before it falls to bits.

The 2,000 year-old is one of Rome’s best known landmarks, but although the building is a ruin it is in desperate need of repair – not to restore it to its former glory, but to make it safe and more attractive for visitors.

The Colosseum or Flavian Amphitheatre (its proper name) is perhaps the most attractive archeological venue in the world with some four million visitors a year. Construction on the city’s iconic monument started between 70 and 72 AD under the Emperor Vespasian. It was completed in 80 AD by his son Titus, who financed the project from the booty his armies seized in the war against the Jews in 66-70 AD.

Authorities are hoping to raise 25 million Euros to help maintain the building, and they are hoping that businesses will sponsor parts of the repair.  While it may be an attractive option for businesses to plaster their names all over the iconic building, sponsors ability to highlight their involvement  will be minimal, with no garish signs or logos allowed.

It is hoped that enough funds will be raised to restore almost 13,000 square metres of exterior walls, remove some unsightly barriers between the arches and to add “state-of-the-art” metal detectors, which is a bit sad when you consider that the main entertainment at the Colosseum depended on men wielding weapons for the public’s enjoyment.

Some businesses have already expressed an interest in sponsorship, but if it were me, I’d contact businesses that had some connection to the Colosseum, so the first businesses I’d see would be Caesar’s Palace and Wilkinson Sword.

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